Recent Articles

  • The Thrill of the Hunt: A Diver’s Guide to Lobster

    The Thrill of the Hunt: A Diver’s Guide to Lobster

    Who says we don’t have seasons in California? We most certainly do! There is lobster season and everything else. We’ll keep this simple: California spiny lobsters (“bugs”) are very tasty. They’re also hard to find at local seafood specialty stores and restaurants — and are often outrageously expensive when you can find them. Finally, they are a lot of fun …Read More »

  • Camouflage and Courtship: The Colorful Lives of California Kelpfish

    Giant kelpfish tend to keep their distance. I have many images of them taken from several feet away as they pretend to be part of the scenery. Since they can change colors (red, lime green, yellow and brown) and patterns to match the kelp or algae in which they have chosen to lurk, as long as they remain stationary this …Read More »

  • SoCal’s Bluewater Sharks: The Blue Shark and Shortfin Mako

    The first time I saw a blue shark was during the summer of 1975. I am certain of the timing because that time frame was the first time I dived at the Channel Islands. And when we were on our way to and from the islands during daylight hours we were almost certain to see the dorsal fins of dozens …Read More »

  • There’s No Place Like Home

    Like most divers I know, I thoroughly enjoy my dive trips to tropical destinations. After all, who doesn’t enjoy great visibility, warm water, colorful reefs and all of the associated marine life?  In the coming months, various photo assignments will have me diving off the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe, Dominica and Grand Cayman. As you probably suspect, I am looking …Read More »

  • The Bizarre World of Pelagic Invertebrates

    The Bizarre World of Pelagic Invertebrates

    I have come to view the oceans as an immense bowl of salty soup. Billions of creatures ride its currents, some visible to the naked eye, but many so tiny they can only be seen under a microscope. Some creatures will eventually settle down and live their adult lives far from where they started out. Others will spend their entire …Read More »

  • The Challenges of California Underwater Photography: A Guide to Local Shooting Success

    Here’s a quick photo fact: it is technically easier to shoot compelling underwater photos in the bright sunlight and clear water of the tropics. Compared to the tropics, shooting in California means shooting in generally dark water that has less visibility and more suspended particulate matter. But just because California water is less forgiving is not to say creating pleasing …Read More »

  • Summertime Is The Right Time

    Water temperature is on the rise. Visibility is increasing. There’s plenty of daylight to go along with flattening seas and small surf. You’ll find a variety of migrating fishes in a lot of sites. And our kelp forests and reef communities are exploding with new life. It’s summertime, and our diving season has kicked into high gear. Like a lot …Read More »

  • Massive Anchovy School Migrates Off La Jolla

    The waters off La Jolla in San Diego were filled with anchovies in early July, as a massive school of the fish migrated near shore, leading to a spectacular sight recorded by researchers from the San Diego-based Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). The event gained nationwide media attention. According to Scripps, the giant school of California anchovies, also called northern …Read More »

  • Own Unique California Underwater Art

    This year’s Scuba Show featured a lot of artistic talent from our attendees who helped assemble the collaborative painting featured on this month’s cover. The underwater California reef scene was divided into 414 small square chips that guest artists reproduced onto larger tile “canvases.” They used paint, glitter, crayons, pastels and pencil. The completed tiles were placed together with stunning …Read More »

  • Swimming, Swirling, Schooling, Shoaling: How Fishes Move About

    Taking photos of fish schools is one of my favorite underwater activities. It’s always challenging and getting good photos isn’t easy. Schooling fish tend to move away from you in unison, so it’s hard to get close. Only rarely do they let you into their midst. Like birds in the sky, a fish school acts as one, changing direction in …Read More »

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